A beauty called, Iris

With striking uniqueness and beauty, irises have rich meanings and they can convey deep sentiments.

With over 200 varieties in a wide spectrum of colours, the iris, which fittingly takes its name from the Greek word for ‘rainbow’, can be found in virtually every corner of the world, growing both naturally and horticulturally. While garden irises can come in any of these many varieties, the flower’s cut versions are mostly blue (the most popular type), white, and yellow.

The iris’s history is rich. It goes back to Ancient Greek times when the Greek Goddess Iris, who was the messenger of the gods and the embodiment of the rainbow, acted as the link between heaven and earth. Irises in purple were planted over the graves of women. This way, the Goddess Iris would accompany the departed in their afterlife journey.

Ancient Egyptian kings marveled in the iris’s exotic nature and illustrations have been found of the flower in a number of Egyptian palaces.

 

During the Middle Ages, the meaning of the iris became linked to the French monarchy, and the Fleur-de-lis eventually became the recognised national symbol of France. From their earliest years, irises were used to make perfume and as a medicinal remedy.

Today, they are primarily seen in gardens, in bouquets, and in the wild all over the world. There are some gorgeous names for the different variants of iris.

Amazing Grace, Mystic Dragon, Evening Drama, Queen of Angels, Uncle Charlie, Blonde Bearded Lady, Vision in Pink, Last Hurrah, Starlight Express,

Throughout its intricate history, the significance of the iris has come to include faith, hope and wisdom. Depending on factors such as colour and region, irises may bear additional meanings as well. In some parts of the world, the dark blue or purple iris can denote royalty, whereas the yellow iris can be a symbol of passion. Irises may also express courage and admiration.




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